Pentagon memo provides details on Trump's military parade: No tanks


The Pentagon has begun preparing for President Trump's requested military parade in Washington, D.C., but preliminary plans suggest it won't involve any tanks like the Bastille Day celebration that inspired it.

The memo, with Thursday's date, says its goal is to "provide initial guidance for the planning and execution" of a procession that would run from the White House to the Capitol and integrate with the city's annual Veterans Day parade.

While sketching out guidelines for the parade, the memo further announced it would "include wheeled vehicles only, no tanks - consideration must be given to minimise damage to local infrastructure".

Inspiration for a military parade in Washington, D.C.

The parade will focus on the contributions of American veterans throughout the history of the USA military, starting with the Revolutionary War, and highlight the evolution of women veterans from World War II to the present, according to the memo.

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The planned route for the parade will be from the White House to the Capitol Building, which is 1.8 miles long. There are also plans for soldiers to wear period uniforms dating back to the Revolutionary War.

Trump praised the French display months later when he and Macron met in NY, saying: "We're going to have to try and top it". Northern Command, which oversees US troops in North America, will execute the parade.

Trump was apparently inspired to throw a military parade after attending France's Bastille Day celebration in France a year ago.

The letter asked for the inclusion of the Medal of Honor Association, as well as Veterans Service Organizations, and to have veterans and Medal of Honor recipients standing around President Trump at the Capitol.

Military parades are also a highlight of the calendar in Moscow and Pyongyang but are rare in the United States, where displays of patriotism usually take the form of flag-waving, fireworks and grilled hot dogs. "It was two hours on the button, and it was military might, and I think a tremendous thing for France and for the spirit of France", Trump said in September.