North Korea missile prompted Singapore Air plane re-route

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Channel News Asia reported Wednesday that Singapore Airlines has been taking steps to reroute the flight path since July this year.

The crew of the Cathay Pacific Airways flight says they witnessed the rogue nation's latest weapon break apart and explode as it traveled through the sky early Wednesday morning on November 29.

Shortly after the test, a spokesperson for the U.S. Defense Department acknowledged that the North Korean missile "flew through busy airspace used by commercial airliners".

The North Korean missile was sacked very high up, reaching an altitude of 4,475 kilometers (2,780 miles) before falling back into the Sea of Japan about 950 kilometers (600 miles) from where it was launched.

Despite catching glimpses of the weapon-thought to be the deadliest missile in North Korea's arsenal-Cathay Pacific and Korean Air had not chosen to alter their routes as of Tuesday, according to a Bloomberg report.

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"At the moment, no one is changing any routes or operating parameters", the Hong Kong-based airline said in a statement.

Any missile launches must be reported to the International Civil Aviation Organization to assure the safety of civilian aircraft. The decision comes after Pyongyang's continuous missile tests in the Sea of Japan disregarding global opposition.

The South China Morning Post says radar information shows other airlines were also flying in the general area of the test-including two Taiwanese airlines flying to Taipei from Vancouver and Seattle....and a Japanese airline flying from Frankfurt to Tokyo. The most recent incident was when the crew of Cathay Pacific and Korean Air spotted the Hwasong 15 missile launched last week by North Korea.

Travelers who are concerned should know the chances of an airplane colliding with a missile are extremely low: One safety analyst estimates that it is less than a billion to one.

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