Saudi strikes rock Yemeni capital after ex-president slain

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The head of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard says a plot against Yemen's Shiite rebels was "nipped in the bud", apparently referring to the killing of former President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Mohamed Ali al-Houthi, a rebel leader, said in a speech Tuesday that "some sons" of Saleh have been hospitalized, without providing further details.

Yemen's minister of information called upon the Houthi armed group to release the journalists and urged worldwide organisations to "leave the status of passive onlookers and take acts to press the militias to stop tormenting all the Yemeni journalists", Muammar Al- Eryani told Saba Net.

Fierce clashes broke out in Sanaa last week between Saleh supporters and the Iran-backed Houthis as a fragile alliance between the two sides broke down.

Photos and Videos of the brutal assassination went viral on social media, shortly after announcing his death by the rebel militia.

Global anti-poverty organization Oxfam praised Trump's action but called on him to do more to stop the bloodshed, including pushing for a ceasefire and ending arms sales to the Saudi-led coalition.

Saleh ruled Yemen for more than three decades until an Arab Spring uprising forced him to step down in 2012.

- Houthi rebels hold over 40 journalists hostage in Yemen.

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They closed the ports last month after the Houthis fired a ballistic missile toward an airport in the Saudi capital of Riyadh, thereby blocking shipments of food and medicine and triggering broad worldwide outrage.

As of November, 5,295 civilians have been killed and another 8,873 injured in the war, according to the United Nations.

But that alliance unravelled over the past week, with dozens reported dead in heavy clashes as the former leader reached out to the Saudi-led coalition that has waged devastating air strikes against the Huthis since September 2015.

On Saturday, Saleh offered to "turn a new page" with the Saudi-led coalition if it stopped attacking Yemen and ended its crippling blockade of the country.

Saleh's slaying likely gives the rebels the upper hand in the dayslong fighting for the country's capital, Sanaa. The coalition threw its support behind Saleh when he turned on the rebels, and may now back his son. That helped propel Yemen into the ruinous civil war that has spread hunger and disease among its 28 million people.

From the Saudi capital, Riyadh, where he has been in self-imposed exile for most of the war, Hadi tried on Monday to rally Saleh's allies to keep up the fight against the Houthis.

The International Committee of the Red Cross said Monday that at least 125 people had been killed and some 240 wounded in Sanaa since the fighting began last week.

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