Here's why you may pay more for your Christmas tree this year

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"I'm playing a show at Irving Plaza for Christmas this year, which is gonna be really exciting, on December 1", he explains, referring to the small, yet legendary, NY club. There's a supply shortage in certain parts of the country and leading to higher prices.

But it takes a Christmas tree about a decade to reach 7 or 8 feet tall, so we're likely to feel the pinch this holiday season when we're tree shopping.

The Mississippi Department of Agriculture & Commerce launched a website to help shoppers find Christmas trees. But there's no sticker shock around here.

Nicer Tree, Cheaper Price Owner Jay Wisshack says, "I think next year might be a little worse".

Experts say there is a shortage of trees and with demand higher than in past years, finding that ideal tree is going to be harder than ever.

There are about 15,000 tree farms in the United States, and the top Christmas tree producing states are Oregon, North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Washington.

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During the financial crisis nine years ago cash strapped Americans bought fewer trees.

Planning on getting a real Christmas tree this season? On a stage centered in front of the decorated Christmas tree, the duo added personal twists to Christmas classics and played their own original holiday pieces.

"Have you been able to order more trees", a reporter asks.

"We've found that people just love being together with the community, the tree and the fireworks-all that stuff is what they come for", said Thompson. The shortage is being blamed on the recession in 2007 and 2008, when growers didn't plant as many trees.

The National Christmas Tree Association says there should be enough trees for everyone who wants one to get one.

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