The Windows Phone Obituary Has Been Tweeted

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In a series of tweets, Microsoft's Joe Belfiore has revealed on the micro-blogging social media network that the software giant will no longer be bringing in hardware and feature updates to Windows Phone. The company confirmed via a tweet posted Sunday evening.

Windows 10 Mobile certainly had its fans, but it appears the platform died because of the lack of interest from developers themselves. "Paid money. wrote apps 4 them. but volume of users is too low for most companies to invest", he wrote. Belfiore also addressed the root cause of Windows 10 Mobile's stagnation.

For those who are still holding on to their Windows smartphones though, Belfiore says they will still support their mobile platform.

He then admitted he had switched to an Android phone before commenting on the role of the developer community. Although the Windows Phone platform has been more or less "dead" over the a year ago or so, Microsoft did not make any official announcements regarding its plans for the dying mobile operating system.

It is widely acknowledged that Microsoft missed the transition to mobile devices that followed the introduction of the first iPhone in 2007.

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Just like Gates before him, Belfiore admitted that he had also switched away from Windows Phone. The VP though assured the platform will continue to be supported so that bug fixes and updates would be released when needed. However, the user base of Windows phone is just too small to get their interest.

It can be recalled that Windows Phone had gained popularity for the interactive interface which impressed tech critics. He further states that he has shifted the platform for better usability and asked the users to make a call on which to use.

Belfiore explained that "a huge, huge majority of our Windows/Office (and Xbox) users are mixed-ecosystem, and that most users have a different phone and PC platform".

Microsoft is no upstart in the mobile space. Companies and indie developers simply don't want to work on Windows Phone apps - a lot of them probably never cared in the first place.

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